Archive for Intellectual Property

ODG R-8 and R-9 Optic with a OLED Microdisplays (Likely Sony’s)

ODG Announces R-8 and R-9 OLED Microdisplay Headsets at CES

It was not exactly a secret, but Osterhout Design Group (ODG) formally announce their new R-8 headset with dual 720p displays (one per eye) and R-9 headset with dual 1080p displays.  According to their news release, “R-9 will be priced around $1,799 with initial shipping targeted 2Q17, while R-8 will be less than $1,000 with developer units shipping 2H17.

Both devices use use OLED microdisplays but with different resolutions (the R-9 has twice the pixels). The R-8 has a 40 degree field of view (FOV) which is similar to Microsoft’s Hololens and the R-9 has about a 50 degree FOV.

The R-8 appears to be marketed more toward “consumer” uses with is lower price point and lack of an expansion port, while ODG is targeting the R-9 to more industrial uses with modular expansion. Among the expansion that ODG has discussed are various cameras and better real world tracking modules.

ODG R-7 Beam Splitter Kicks Image Toward Eye

With the announcement comes much better pictures of the headsets and I immediately noticed that their optics were significantly different than I previously thought. Most importantly, I noticed in the an ODG R-8 picture that the beam splitter is angled to kicks the light away from the eye whereas the prior ODG R-7 had a simple beam splitter that kicks the image toward the eye (see below).

ODG R-8 and R-8 Beam Splitter Kicks Image Away From Eye and Into A Curved Mirror

The ODG R-8 (and R-9 but it is harder to see on the available R-9 pictures) does not have a simple beam splitter but rather a beam splitter and curve mirror combination. The side view below (with my overlays of the outline of the optics including some that are not visible) that the beam splitter kicks the light away from the eye and toward partial curved mirror that acts as a “combiner.” This curve mirror will magnify and move the virtual focus point and then reflects the light back through the beam splitter to the eye.

On the left I have taken Figure 169 from ODG’s US Patent 9,494,800. Light from the “emissive display” (ala OLED) passes through two lenses before being reflected into the partial mirror. The combination of the lenses and the mirror act to adjust the size and virtual focus point of the displayed image. In the picture of the ODG R-8 above I have taken the optics from Figure 169 and overlaid them (in red).

According to the patent specification, this configuration “form(s) at wide field of view” while “The optics are folded to make the optics assembly more compact.”

At left I have cropped the image and removed the overlay so you can see the details of the beam splitter and curved mirror joint.  You hopefully can see the seam where the beam splitter appears to be glued to the curved mirror suggesting the interior between the curved mirror and beam splitter is hollow. Additionally there is a protective cover/light shade over the outside of the curved mirror with a small gap between them.

The combined splitter/mirror is hollow to save weight and cost. It is glued together to keep dust out.

ODG R-6 Used A Similar Splitter/Mirror

I could not find a picture of the R-8 or R-9 from the inside, but I did find a picture on the “hey Holo” blog that shows the inside of the R-6 that appears to use the same optical configuration as the R-8/R-9. The R-6 introduced in 2014 had dual 720p displays (one per eye) and was priced at $4,946 or about 5X the price of the R-8 with the same resolution and similar optical design.  Quite a price drop in just 2 years.

ODG R-6, R-8, and R-9 Likely Use Sony OLED Microdisplays

Interestingly, I could not find anywhere were ODG says what display technology they use in the 2014 R-6, but the most likely device is the Sony ECX332A 720p OLED microdisplay that Sony introduced in 2011. Following this trend it is likely that the ODG R-9 uses the newer Sony ECX335 1080p OLED microdisplay and the R-9 uses the ECE332 or a follow-on version. I don’t know any other company that has both a 720p and 1080p OLED microdisplays and the timing of the Sony and ODG products seems to fit. It is also very convenient for ODG that both panels are the same size and could use the same or very similar optics.

Sony had a 9.6 micron pixel on a 1024 by 768 OLED microdisplay back in 2011 so for Sony the pixel pitch has gone from 9.6 in 2011 to 8.2 microns on the 1080p device. This is among the smallest OLED microdisplay pixel pitches I have seen but still is more than 2x linearly and 4x in area bigger than the smallest LCOS (several companies have LCOS pixels pitches in the 4 micron or less range).

It appears that ODG used an OLED microdisplay for the R-6 then switched (likely for cost reasons) to LCOS and a simple beam splitter for the R7 and then back to OLEDs and the splitter/mirror optics for the R-8 and R-9.

Splitter/Combiner Is an Old Optic Trick

This “trick” of mixing lenses with a spherical combiner partial mirror is an old idea/trick. It often turns out that mixing refractive (lenses) with mirror optics can lead to a more compact and less expensive design.

I have seen a beam splitter/mirror used many times. The ODG design is a little different in that the beam splitter is sealed/mated to the curved mirror which with the pictures available earlier make it hard to see. Likely as not this has been done before too.

This configuration of beam splitter and curve mirror even showed up in Magic Leap applications such as Fig. 9 from 2015/0346495 shown at right. I think this is the optical configuration that Magic Leap used with some of their prototypes including the one seen by “The Information.

Conclusion/Trends – Turning the Crank

The ODG optical design while it may seem a bit more complex than a simple beam splitter, is actually probably simpler/easier to make than doing everything with lenses before the beam splitter. Likely they went to this technique to support a wider FOV.

Based on my experience, I would expect that ODG optical design will be cleaner/better than the waveguide designs of Microsoft’s Hololens. The use of OLED microdisplays should give ODG superior contrast which will further improve the perceived sharpness of the image. While not as apparent to the casual observer, but as I have discussed previously, OLEDs won’t work with diffractive/holographic waveguides such as Hololens and Magic Leap are using.

What is also interesting that in terms of resolution and basic optics, the R-8 with 720p is about 1/5th the price of the military/industrial grade 720p R-6 of about 2 years ago. While the R-9 in addition to having a 1080p display, has some modular expansion capability, one would expect there will be follow-on product with 1080p with a larger FOV and more sensors in a price range of the R-8 in the not too distant future and perhaps with integration of the features from one or more of the R-9’s add-on modules; this as we say in the electronics industry, “is just a matter of turning the crank.”

Everything VR & AR Podcast Interview with Karl Guttag About Magic Leap

With all the buzz surrounding Magic Leap and this blog’s technical findings about Magic Leap, I was asked to do an interview by the “Everything VR & AR Podcast” hosted by Kevin Harvell. The podcast is available on iTunes and by direct link to the interview here.

The interview starts with about 25 minutes of my background starting with my early days at Texas Instruments. So if you just want to hear about Magic Leap and AR you might want to skip ahead a bit. In the second part of the interview (about 40 minutes) we get into discussing how I went about figuring out what Magic Leap was doing. This includes discussing how the changes in the U.S. patent system signed into law in 2011 with the America Invents Act help make the information available for me to study.

There should be no great surprises for anyone that has followed this blog. It puts in words and summarizes a lot that I have written about in the last 2 months.

Update: I listen to the podcast and noticed that I misspoke a few times; it happens in live interviews.  An unfathomable mistake is that I talked about graduating college in 1972 but that was high school; I graduated from Bradley University with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering in 1976 and then received and MSEE from The University of Michigan in 1977 (and joined TI in 1977).  

I also think I greatly oversimplified the contribution of Mark Harward as a co-founder at Syndiant. Mark did much more than just have desigeners, he was the CEO, an investor, and and the company while I “played” with the technology, but I think Mark’s best skill was in hiring great people. Also, Josh Lund, Tupper Patnode, and Craig Waller were co-founders. 

 

Magic Leap: Are Parts of Their NDAs Now Unenforceable?

mousy-responseRony Abovitz’s tweet about “mousy tech bloggers” and one of its responses made me realize something I was taught way back about NDA and intellectual property. It is summarized well (with my bold emphasis) in the article, “What You Probably Don’t Know About Non Disclosure Agreements”:

Remember that if you have 99 people sign an NDA and 1 person doesn’t, that person can publish your idea in the Wall Street Journal – and to add insult to injury, when they do, the other NDAs all become invalid since they only apply to confidential information.

Reed Albergotti with “The Information,” was shown demos previously were not open to the public and as best I am aware did not have an NDA or other confidential agreement. Also David M. Ewalt of Forbes Magazine wrote on Reddit:

I didn’t sign an NDA, but I agreed not to reveal certain proprietary details”

So when Arghya Sur  (copied above) in his response asked Rony Abivutz to “publicly reveal and demos (sic)”. So I’m left wondering what is and what is not confidential now at Magic Leap? Has Magic Leap inadvertently already done what Arghya Sur requested? Has Magic Leap at least caused some people to be released from some parts of their NDAs?

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer and my understanding is that this is contract issue based on the laws for the state(s) that governed the NDAs in question. Also, I have not seen ML’s NDAs nor do I know what they cover. There are likely severability clauses meant to limit the damage if there is a breach of some parts.

And it might be even worse. As I remember it, if a company is generally sloppy in their handling and protecting of what they tell people is confidential material, then you can’t enforce your confidential/NDA agreements. The principle is, how can you expect people to know what is “really confidential” from what is “only marked confidential?”

And Rony Abovitz is not just anybody at Magic Leap, he is CEO and and met with the reporters and presumably had some idea as to what they were being shown. This also goes to why you should not tweet about “mouse tech bloggers” if you are a CEO, it makes them ask questions.

I would appreciate if those with expertise  in this area would weigh-in  with your comments. Please don’t give any legal advice to anyone, but rather let people know how you what you were taught about handling NDA material.

BTW

I am always amused and a little shocked when I seen slides at open conferences with “Confidential” market on them. I was taught to NEVER do. If the material is not longer confidential, then remove it from the slides. You probably will not get the “confidential death sentence” for doing it once, but it should not become routine or the company might find all their confidential agreements unenforceable.