Microvision Laser Beam Scanning: Everything Old Is New Again

Reintroducing a 5 Year Old Design?

Microvision, the 23 year old “startup” in Laser Beam Scanning (LBS), has been a fun topic on this blog since 2011. They are a classic example of a company that tries to make big news out of what other companies would consider to not be news worthy.

Microvision has been through a lot of “business models” in their 23 years. They have been through selling “engines”, building whole products (the ShowWX), licensing model with Sony selling engines, and now with their latests announcement “MicroVision Begins Shipping Samples to Customers of Its Small Form Factor Display Engine they are back to selling “engines.”

The funny thing is this “new” engine doesn’t look very much different from it “old” engine it was peddling about 5 years ago. Below I have show 3 laser microvision engines from 2017, 2012, and 2013 to roughly to the same scale and they all look remarkably similar. The 2012 and 2017 engine are from Microvision and the 2013 engine was inside the 2013 Pioneer aftermarket HUD. The Pioneer HUD appears use a nearly identical engine and within 3mm of the length of the “new” engine. 


The “new” engine is smaller than the 2014 Sony engine that used 5 lasers (two red, two green, and one blue) to support higher brightness and higher power with lower laser speckle shown at left.  It appears that the “new” Microvision engine is really at best a slightly modified 2012 model, with maybe some minor modification and newer laser diodes.

What is missing from Microvision’s announcement is any measurable/quantifiable performance information, such as the brightness (lumens) and power consumption (Watts). In my past studies of Microvision engines, they have proven to have much worse lumens per Watt compared to other (DLP and LCOS) technologies. I have also found their measurable resolution to be considerably less (about half in horizontally and vertically) than they their claimed resolution.

While Microvision says, “The sleek form factor and thinness of the engine make it an ideal choice for products such as smartphones,” one needs to understand that the size of the optical engine with is drive electronics is about equal to the entire contents of a typical smartphone. And the projector generally consumes more power than the rest of the phone which makes it both a battery size and a heat issue.

One comment

  1. Alfred E Neuman says:

    This company has a long history of hyping up what is really nothing more than some engineering sample sales.

    Shipping samples to customers doesn’t mean that a volume order will follow or that a partnership exists.

    In effect, they’re back to where they were in 2007.

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